Pedals by brand

Pedals by brand

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JHS Alpine reverb

The JHS Alpine Reverb is the first reverb pedal by JHS pedals. It is based on the Sky Cloud 9, keeping its main core features, but taking it into the next level.

Check out this video of Josh Scott from JHS pedals discussing the history of the Alpine reverb.

A highly tweak-able, versatile, inspiring and cost effective solution for any situation your gig might throw at you

That is what the people in JHS Pedals say about the Alpine: In a world full of reverb pedals we are proud to offer up a highly tweak-able, versatile, inspiring and cost effective solution for any situation your gig might throw at you. 

The heart of the Alpine’s design is the idea that you can have a reverb pedal that is straight forward, easy to use, but also extremely powerful in its functions all while still very approachable without requiring a degree in computer engineering to dial in a great sound.

Features and controls

The Alpine reverb has a 9V negative power supply connector, drawing a current of about 100mA. It’s got an instrument input (mono), instrument output (mono) and an effects loop (EFX loop) connectors. You can connect to the Alpine a TRS stereo to 2 mono cable and add any pedal you want into the loop. This way, you can create great shimmer effects with an additional octaver, or endless reverbs by adding a delay pedal.

Despite its great versatility in recreating different reverberations, the JHS Alpine Reverb doesn’t include any knob for setting the reverb mode. However, playing with the knobs is pretty straightforward, and you’ll get the sound you like very easily.

The JHS Alpine Reverb has 5 controls: reverb, depth, highs, length, shift, and two stomp switches, one for activating the pedal, and another one that activates the shift knob. This switch can be used to activate the effects loop too.

  • Reverb controls the mix between the dry and wet sounds.
  • Depth changes the size of the reverb, to emulate smaller or bigger reverberating environments.
  • Highs is essentially a tone control for high frequencies, allowing you to change between darker and brighter reverb tones. However, it is not as simple as that. This control reacts differently depending on how the rest of the knobs are set, creating different types of reverb (spring, plate, room, etc.)
  • Length is the length (decay) of the reverb.
  • Shift. This control is activated with the shift on/off stomp switch, and is an additional wet/dry mix of the reverb. This way, you can switch between 2 reverb presets when playing, which is great for onstage conditions

Sound

This pedal looks gorgeous, and sounds awesome. Apart from the sound, my favorite feature of the pedal is the EFX loop and the shift function, which allows you dramatically changing the sound of the reverb.

I have to admit that I only had the opportunity to play with the Alpine Reverb for a few minutes. It was in a family trip to NYC and wanted to try other gear that I don’t easily find back in Europe, so had to diversify my time…

However, I realize that it was so easy to get a great sound from it! Either with crystal clear clean sounds or with dirty overdrives, I got the sound with a few tweaks with the knobs.

You will enjoy playing with this pedal because it’s very easy to use but very versatile at the same time.

Check out the videos of the playlist below to see how it sounds.

Should you buy this pedal?

If you are looking to a reverb pedal that is easy to use, but want something more than just a spring reverb, the JHS Alpine Reverb is a good option.

If you like experimenting by creating new different sounds, you will enjoy the effects loop in the Alpine Reverb. Depending on the effect you put within the loop, you can create very distinct and original sounds

You may like the Alpine Reverb to play live with too. The shift knob is activated with a stomp switch, and it comes handy for changing the reverb ambience within different parts in a song. It can be used to activate the pedals within the effects loop as well.

Don’t buy this pedal if you are looking for a pedal that will give you orbital sounds. The EHX Cathedral is a better choice for that within the same price range, and it is stereo.

You’ll probably prefer other reverb pedal if you are thinking in using it with other instruments apart from the guitar. For recording, you won’t get stereo with the Alpine Reverb, neither at the output nor at the input.

Alternatives to the JHS Alpine Reverb

You won’t find many alternatives to the Alpine Reverb that sound that great within the same price range.

You have the Electro Harmonix Cathedral, that is true stereo and allows you changing between 8 reverb modes. It’s also a versatile pedal, but a little more complicated to use, at least for the first time. You’ll need some time to get used to it and make it sound awesome (but you’ll get to it, and will absolutely love it).

You also have the T-Rex Room Mate Junior, that also incorporates a mode selector knob to play with.

On the higher end, you won’t get disappointed if you go for a Strymon blueSky. Also very versatile, and very easy to use. And it sounds AWESOME! One of the best reverb pedals out there. But you’ll have to spend a little more…

Conclusion

As I said before, I could spend the time I wanted with the Alpine Reverb (just a few minutes with it). These are the pros and cons that summarize my short experience with the JHS Alpine Reverb.

PROS

  • Great versatility with just 5 knobs
  • Switch knob that can be activated with a stomp switch for a 2 different reverb settings
  • It includes a built-in effects loop that will allow you create amazing sounds
  • It looks gorgeous (I love the look of JHS pedals)
  • Used with single coils sounds vintage!

CONS

  • You can’t select between reverb types
  • It’s not stereo. It would be great to have, at least, a stereo output for a more 3D ambience recreation

When doing my research about reverb pedals, I instantly fell in love with the JHS Alpine Reverb. I must admit that it was because how it looked first. Then because how it sounded like by watching reviews in youtube (see the playlist above). Finally I could try it and my experience was great. Short, but great. Loved the different ambiences I was able to recreate with just 4 knobs, in a few minutes. If you want a great sounding reverb pedal for your guitar that is easy to use, the JHS Alpine Reverb is a great choice.

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If you are looking for the best reverb pedal from Electro Harmonix, get an EHX Cathedral.

Then, you may think “why to think about buying another pedal from EHX whose features are included in the Cathedral?”. The answer is clear to me: because the EHX Holy Grail is an icon.  In this review, I’ve bring this pedal in its new (and smaller) version: the Holy Grail nano.

Before we get into the point, you can read a lot of reviews here.

Divine reverb for mere mortals

There isn’t just one Holy Grail. This pedal is based on the same circuitry as the Electro Harmonix Holy Grail, but in a smaller size, as many other icon stompboxes from the brand do (Big Muff nano, Memory Toy, etc.). It looks great, and just the most advanced high-resolution ears could tell any difference between the two versions of the Holy Grail (I can’t).

You’ll a better idea about what this pedal is all about by reading what the EHX people say about it:

Divine reverb for mere mortals. Down from the heavens comes the Holy Grail, a compact digital reverb guitar pedal that is priced so low thou shalt not covet thy neighbor’s reverb tank any longer. 

The Holy Grail will make you a believer with its emulation of classic Spring reverb so faithful that even Dick Dale couldn’t tell the difference. Next, get lost in the lush spaciousness of the Hall reverb and ask yourself, “how did they fit Notre Dame into such a small package?” Finally, reach enlightenment with the haunting Flerb.

Features and controls

The Holy Grail features three types of reverb: Spring (the kind of spring reverb built-in vintage tube amplifiers), Hall, and Flerb, which is a cool mixture between reverb and flanger that you won’t find in any other pedal (apart from the EHC Cathedral). It will get right to the point because it is super easy to use: you just select the type of reverb and roll the Reverb knob for the amount of reverb you want. Easy.

This pedal is mono, and it’s powered with a 9V negative power supply. I haven’t tested the current consumption, but it’s for sure lower than the 200mA that you’re supposed to provided at least, according to EHX.

The Holy Grail has just a single Knob (Reverb) and a small switch, to select the reverb type (spring, hall, flerb). It also has a true bypass stomp switch.

  • Reverb is simply the mix between your dry and wet (reverberated) sound. If you roll this control up, the sound is fully wet.

Sound

As every single pedal made by Electro Harmonix, the Holy Grail sounds awesome. The easiest reverb pedal to use, just like the Reverb knob in any vintage tube amplifier with built-in spring reverb.

And know what? You won’t need any other control. For sure that additional tone and depth controls would give you more versatility with the reverb, but these parameters have been preset in such a natural way that you won’t miss them at all.

Another thing worth mentioning is the Flerb. It’s a unique feature, and it’s not just a reverb and a flanger blended together. You’ll discover that when playing with the Flerb and the Reverb knob there’s plenty of sweet spots than will take your playing to places any other reverb pedal will.

This pedal is essential…

Check out the videos in the playlist below, I’m sure you will love the Electro Harmonix Holy Grail.

Should you buy this pedal?

If you are looking for a reverb pedal, and you want something simple that just works, the Holy Grail is a safe bet. You won’t get lost by playing with too many knobs, because you will only have one. Just like in amps. But will have a little more versatility thanks to its three reverb modes.

If you don’t want to spend a fortune in a reverb pedal because you want something to just live it there so your sound gets warmer and more present, this pedal will do the job.

You will also want to buy this pedal if you love guitar pedals. This one is another myth, and will always fit on your pedalboard or in your gigbag.

Don’t think of this pedal if you want a more complex pedal that is able to provide you with plenty of different and complex reverb sounds. The Holy Grail has a Hall mode, but you have plenty of better alternatives to that.

You won’t like this pedal if you are serious about spring reverb. Even tough it sounds great, it doesn’t sound like vintage outboard spring tanks. You have better options for that.

Alternatives to the Electro Harmonix Holy Grail Nano

If you like spring reverbs, you have to check other pedals that are a little more complex than the Holy Grail, but are more indicated to recreate the sound of vintage outboard spring tanks. My top favorites are the Catalinbread Topanga Spring Reverb (the best one), the Wampler Faux Spring Reverb and the Mad Professor Silver Spring Reverb.

On the other hand, you have another pedal that is pretty similar to the Holy Grail: the Mooer Shimverb. It sounds pretty well and is tiny too. The sound is not that great though, but it has a Shimmer effect that can be very spiring. And its price is sooooo great

Conclusion

This pedal is a classic. And it’s just plug and play, here goes a little summary of what I think about it.

PROS

  • Simplicity. Roll the Reverb knob and sound great. Easy
  • Spring and Hall reverbs sound nice and warm.
  • Flerb gives you a unique tone
  • It fits on any pedalboard, it is tiny
  • Great price
  • It is a classic, an icon

CONS

  • It doesn’t have a Tone control
  • It is not true bypass

The Electro Harmonix Holy Grail Nano reverb is a safe bet if you’re looking for a simple pedal. Just select the reverb type you wanna use, roll the Reverb knob up and you will be ready to go. The Spring sounds pretty realistic, the Hall is ok, and the Flerb is cool. This pedal is a classic and the price is great.

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Eventide Space Reverb

The Eventide Space Reverb is another great reverb unit, kind of similar in features and quality of sound (and price range) than the Strymon BigSky.

Never before has there been a more dazzling collection of reverb algorithms

Eventide is known for its top-of-the-range rack effects processors. Now you have the best reverb presets from the history of eventide (with additional features) included in a stompbox: Room, Plate, Spring, Hall, Reverse, Shimmer, ModEchoVerb, DualVerb, BlackholeTM, MangledVerbTM, TremoloVerb and Dynaverb.

These are the words from Eventide about the Space Reverb:

Space features 12 of Eventide’s signature reverb combination effects culled from the H8000FW and Eclipse V4 along with some startling new magic. 

Space includes 100 presets, including presets crafted by Flood and Alan Moulder (The Killers, Nine Inch Nails, Smashing Pumpkins, My Bloody Valentine, 30 Seconds to Mars, PJ Harvey and Them Crooked Vultures), Justin Meldal-Johnsen (Beck, Nine Inch Nails), Richard Devine (sound designer, synthesist, performer, remixer), Vernon Reid (Living Colour), Amedeo Pace (Blonde Redhead), Alex Somers and Jonsi Birgisson (Jonsi and Alex, Sigur Ros), Amadeo Pace (Blonde Redhead) and John Agnello (Patti Smith, Sonic Youth, Dinosaur Jr., and Kurt Vile). 

These unique effects, previously available only in Eventide rack processors, are now available in a compact, roadworthy package. 

Never before has there been a more dazzling collection of reverb algorithms combined with delays, pitch shifting, tremolo, modulation, and spatial effects in such a compact and affordable package.

If you need some proof about the magnificence of this pedal, you better take a seat: it has been awarded with the TEC Award, the Wish I had one Award by musicradar.com, the Guitar Player Magazine’s Editors’ Pick Award, the TMR Zoo Editor’s Choice Award, and Premier Guitar’s Premier Gear Award, among others.

Features and controls

The Eventide Space Reverb includes 12 built-in reverb modes:

Room is designed to dial in realistic room sounds from vocal booths to small halls.

Plate simulates the sound of early analog-mechanical artificial reverbs.

Spring models the sound and character of the popular artificial reverbs found in guitar amplifiers.

Hall simulates the sound of large enclosed spaces.

Reverse stands for a true reverse reverb followed by a forward reverb with delay and feedback.

Shimmer. This is what Eventide says about this preset: We don’t have proof, but we’re pretty sure this is what the guitars sound like in heaven.

ModEchoVerb is based on a popular reverb structure from the Eventide H8000 that brought about such presets as “Echo Space of God” and “Glorious Flange Canyon.” It feeds the output of an infinite reverb into an infinite feedback delay and slathers on an extra helping of modulation.

DualVerb combines two different high quality studio reverbs (A and B) with independent controls for decay, size, pre-delay, and EQ.

BlackholeTM is larger than the Hall or Room, BlackHole is an Eventide H8000 classic capable of cathedral- type spaces to out-of-this-world soundscapes.

MangledVerbTM. While Space produces many beautiful sounds, we recognize the universe is a chaotic and often violent place, so in the spirit of the yin and yang, we included MangledVerb from the Eventide Eclipse. Technically, MangledVerb feeds a non-standard stereo reverb into distortion, but sonically it can range from the light friction of a bow scraping a cello string to the mayhem of a caged beast being poked with a red hot flounder.

TremoloVerb is a celestially large reverb cut back down to Earth size by an aggressive tremolo. Use the Sine, Triangle, Peak, Ramp, or Square waves to create a rhythmic ambience.

Dynaverb couples an Eventide Eclipse reverb with a model of the Eventide Omnipressor® to create an adaptable dynamics reverb. The Omnipressor is capable of all types of dynamics processing from gating, expansion, compression, limiting, and even its signature “dynamic reversal,” where loud signals are squashed, but quiet signals are amplified. In DynaVerb, the Omnipressor can dynamically control the output of a reverberator based on, either the input signal for maximum control, the reverb output for incredible chaos, or any mixture of the two.

This pedal’s connectivity is total: Apart from the stereo input and output, it includes a connector for an expression pedal and an additional programable output switch, MIDI connectivity trough USB and In/Out-Through. You can also adjust the level of the input and the output. It is powered via a 9V positive power supply, drawing 1200mA.

It has 11 controls (Mix, Decay, Size, Size, Low, High, Xnob, Ynob, FxMix, and Contour and another one navigate through the different presets, you can store up to 100) and three stomp switches: the left-hand switch always turns the effect on and off, while the other two have different functions, depending on the mode you’re using the pedal in.

  • Preset for changing between presets.
  • Mix establish how the dry and wet sounds are blended.
  • Decay is basically the length of the reverb.
  • Size is the size of the reverb.
  • Delay at which the reverb appears.
  • Low and High for the reverb sound EQ.
  • Xnob and Ynob controls functionality depends on the reverb mode.
  • FxMix is also mode dependent, most of the times introducing some modulation to the reverb.
  • Contour is essentially a tone control, whose functionality is also mode dependent.

Sound

Wow.

This is another great pedal (well, it’s Eventide, what did you expect?). It features any kind of reverb you may imagine, and even more as it can add other effects (like modulation, tremolo, etc.) to the mix.

It sounds great, and you can tweak any reverb mode thanks to its 10 controls, though it can be sometimes a little tricky, as some of the knobs functionalities change with the reverberation mode.

Check out the videos in the playlist below and discover if this great reverb pedal is for you.

But be aware that you’ll have to save a little money…

Should you buy an Eventide Space Reverb?

The Eventide Space Reverb is not just a reverb pedal. It is a powerful electronic synthesizer capable of generating amazing reverb-like sounds. It is so complete (and so complex at the same time). You’ll have to love playing with knobs and parameters if you want this pedal. And, of course, you need some money too…

Alternative to the Eventide Space Reverb

The only alternative you have to the Eventide Space Reverb is the Strymon BigSky. Both of them are the most complete reverb pedals that you’ll find, and both sound awesome. The only differences could be related to some of the algorithms that are unique to each of them. Concerning how they are built and how they sound in general, the two are very similar. Check out this video by Shobel demonstrating the two pedals.

Conclusion

This is a brief summary of my review of the Eventide Space Reverb:

PROS

  • Extreme high quality device
  • Great connectivity
  • It feels so good playing with it
  • A lot of reverb modes
  • The sound is very parametrizable

CONS

  • You have to remember the function of each knob
  • It could be a little difficult to use
  • The price is a little high

There is now doubt the Eventide Space Reverb is one of the greatest pedals of any kind. Sounds great, feels extreme high quality and is the most versatile reverb pedal. The main constraint is its price, but it is definitely worth it.

Check the best offers for the Spice Reverb here.

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Mr Black Deluxe Plus

The Mr. Black Deluxe Plus is another example of a great spring reverb pedal.

It recreates the reverb of those holy spring tanks of vintage tube amps, but also the tube-driven tremolo of the early days. This pedal sounds vintage indeed. Without any doubt, my favorite old school spring reverb pedal along with the Catalinbread Topanga.

With the extra feature of having, in a single stompbox, a great sounding tremolo too!

The sun’s out and the surf’s up, broham.

Load up the woodie, get down to the beach an kick off your kicks, we’re gonna have some fun today.
Splish-splash with a dripping spring and ride the motion of the ocean with smooth bias-modulating tremolo.

Do em one at a time, or two in tandem for the double whammy.  Plus.

This is gnarly, dude. Gnarly.

Features and controls

Another feature that I love about this pedal is how it looks. To me, stompboxes are like small pieces of art, and the paint job of the palm trees at the top of the Deluxe Plus will remind you a beautiful sunny Hawaiian morning. It looks gorgeous, doesn’t it?

Just like in the vintage tube amplifiers that included both built-in reverb and tremolo, the tremolo stage comes after the reverb in the Deluxe Plus. But, in the case of this pedal, the controls have been implemented with much wider ranges.

Reverb and tremolo are two of the most distinctive sounds of the guitar history, mainly from the early sixties. They both sound great when mixed together, creating the characteristic guitar sound of what was called Americana music. In this pedal, you can use both effects at the same time, or each of them individually.

This pedal has instrument input and output mono jacks, and is powered with a 9V negative power supply, requiring 60mA of current to operate.

It’s also very simple with its controls. It has three knobs, one of them to control the reverb (Reverb) and the other two for the tremolo settings (Intensity, Speed). It also has a true bypass stomp switch. This is how the controls of the Mr Black Deluxe Plus Reverb work like:

  • Reverb adjusts the amount of spring reverb that is mixed with the dry sound. If you turn the knob all the way down, you won’t have any reverb out from the pedal. Roll it clockwise, and you’ll obtain a really wet, deep and bright wet sound.
  • Intensity controls the depth of the tremolo. Rolling it clockwise to get a more evident presence of the tremolo. Turn it counter clockwise to get subtle less abrupt amplitude modulation. If turned all the way down, the tremolo will dissapear.
  • Speed changes the speed of the tremolo, as simple as that.

Sound

As you will probably noticed if you read the other reviews from the best reverb pedal series, you will find better sounding pedals than the Mr Black Deluxe Reverb. But none of them is based on the concept of vintage tube amplifiers: a tremolo and a reverb with very simple control knobs, integrated in a single stompbox.

Some people my argue that this pedal would be more versatile if implementing two separate stomp switches, one for the reverb, one for the tremolo. If you need to switch the effects separately when playing live, this could be a drawback for you.

In any case, both effects sound great individually, and they feel great when blended together.

You can hear this pedal by checking out the videos of the playlist below.

Should you buy this pedal?

If you are looking for a combination of spring reverb and tremolo in a single pedal, the Mr. Black Deluxe Plus is a great choice. You will get what you may expect having in Fender Blackface amps.

In my opinion, this is one of the best spring reverb sounds in a pedal. Of course it is not going to be like an outboard tube-driven tank, but is sounds great anyway. However, you’ll be able to adjust the amount of reverb (kind of like a dwell tone, just like in amps), but not the tone or mix. Be aware of that.

And concerning tremolo, it sounds really warm and is very responsive to the controls. If you are looking for a simple tremolo, this pedal is great too. But, you have to think if you’ll need to activate the two effects separately. If so, this pedal is not for you, as it’s got a single stomp switch.

Alternatives to the Mr. Black Deluxe Plus

I tried this pedal in my particular research for the best reverb pedal. Then it also appeared to have a built in tremolo. You have a serious alternative to the Deluxe Plus in the Strymon Flint, another great (as everything Strymon does) pedal. However, I haven’t had the opportunity to play with this guy. The price of it is higher, but it sounds awesome too (as far as I’ve heard from youtube videos).

The other alternative I’d consider if looking for a spring reverb pedal is the Catalinbread Topanga Spring Reverb. This one sounds vintage, you can read tons of positive opinions in forums like this. If you’re serious with surf guitar (and want a backup solution for your outboard unit), the Topanga is a must.

Conclusion

This is a brief summary of the review

PROS

  • You’ll get two great sounding effects in a single stompbox (spring reverb and tremolo)
  • The spring reverb sounds really well
  • Warm-sounding bias tremolo
  • It is true bypass
  • It is hand made in Portland, Oregon

CONS

  • The trem slightly drops the volume
  • You can’t switch on both effects independently

As a conclusion, consider the Mr. Black Deluxe Plus as the perfect solution to include, in a single stompbox, a spring reverb and a tremolo, just like Fender blackface amps do. It sounds really good and vintage. Some may find it pricy, but what you expect for a handmade quality pedal?

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Wampler Faux Spring reverb

Pedal designer Brian Wampler, owner of Wampler Pedals, is fanatical about great tone.

The Wampler Faux Spring Reverb is a great example of that. It goes right to the point: instead of including reverb modes that you’ll never use (like reverse plate reverbs) unless you’re bored at home, you’ll get the sound of an old school, vintage spring tank.

As simple as that. The vintage sound of the sixties electric guitar. Well, that is what I thought at the beginning. However, the more I payed with the pedal, the more modern (less vintage) it sounded to me. Keep on reading…

You can read here what other people say about this pedal.

You can have your reverb be as bright as a day, or dark as night

This is what they say at Wampler Pedals about the Faux Spring Reverb:

The great thing about the Faux Spring Reverb is that it retains the Analog base tone, doesn’t send your signal through digital/analog converters and back again (wrecking your tone completely) allowing you to be as springy as you like without your sound becoming lifeless, dull and… well, bad. 

With the tone control, you can control your sound completely and have your reverb be as bright as day, or dark as night… As lively and bright as a small hall, or as deep as the biggest cathedrals.

However, I would say that this pedal sounds more like the spring reverb you could find built-in in the fender black face amps of the sixties, rather than the more aggressive and wet reverb from outboard units like the ’63 Fender Tube Reverb tank.

Features and controls

As most spring reverb pedals, the Faux Spring Reverb is very simple when speaking about connectivity. It’s got mono in and out, and is powered with a 9V negative power supply, requiring about 80mA of current to operate.

It includes the common knobs that you’ll see in most spring reverb pedals too. In this case, you can adjust the level, length and tone of the reverb with 3 knobs: Level, Depth and Shade controls. It has a single stomp switch too (true bypass).

  • Level controls the amount of reverb mixing with your dry signal.
  • Depth adjusts the size of the reverb.
  • Shade is like a tone control, which will allow you having more sparkling brighter tones when turning clockwise and darker, warmer, more analog tones when rolling counter clockwise.

Sound

This is another great sounding pedal. As it is true bypass and the dry sound stays fully analog, its presence will remain unnoticeable until you need it.

Despite it may seem a little pricy for “just” a single mode reverb pedal, you can be sure that, if you love the vintage old school sound of a spring tank, you will be happy spending what it cost.

Perhaps one thing that some people may find a little annoying is the length of the reverb. It goes up to 2.8s, which could be a little short for those lovers of cavernous deep sounds.

Check out the videos in the playlist below and see how it sounds like.

Should you buy this pedal?

That is a really difficult question. First of all, I’ll assume that you’re thinking of buying a reverb pedal. Now, are you looking for simply a spring reverb pedal? If not, perhaps you need to look for more versatile units, like the JHS Alpine Reverb, the Electro Harmonix Cathedral or the TC Electronic Hall of Fame. All of these are within the same price range than the Wampler Faux Spring Reverb, but include a few reverb types.

If you want a spring reverb pedal, you have to check if you prefer vintage spring tanks (a bit darker sounds) over more modern sounds (although preserving the sound of spring tanks, you get more like a HiFi reverb). If you prefer the second option, this pedal may be for you.

On the other hand, if you like older sounds like those of surf music in the sixties, you may prefer other options (see the next section for alternatives).

Alternatives to the Wampler Faux Spring Reverb

If you are looking for a great spring reverb pedal, you have plenty of awesome options out there: a very similar sounding pedal may be the Mad Professor Silver Spring Reverb. It will be a matter of personal taste what will make you to chose one over the other.

Now, if you are a spring reverb geek and are looking to emulate the sound of vintage outboard spring tanks, you have better alternatives. My personal favorite spring reverb pedal is the Catalinbread Topanga Spring Reverb. This one is really great, it sounds old school.

With less controls, but sounding like fender blackface amps too, you have the Mr. Black Deluxe Plus reverb. It’s a reverb+tremolo pedal, with the controls you had in this kind of vintage amps by Fender. The reverb sounds great too.

You may argue with that, but in my opinion, the Wampler Faux Spring Reverb (and the Mad Professor Silver Spring Reverb too) sound kind of more modern to me.

Conclusion

This is a brief summary of my review of the Faux Spring Reverb:

PROS

  • The Faux Spring Reverb is true bypass
  • The dry signal stays fully analog
  • Great build quality
  • Sounds like a classic Fender Blackface amp

CONS

  • It is a bit expensive
  • The maximum decay time may be too short (2.8s)
  • You may argue it doesn’t sound vintage

As a conclusion, the Wampler Faux Spring Reverb is great sounding pedal, although a little pricy and kind of modern-sounding for some people. In any case, it sounds awesome from the moment you start using it because its knobs react very naturally.

You can check the best prices for this pedal here.

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Strymoon BigSky

Let me say this: The Strymon BigSky is the best reverb pedal I’ve ever played. It is not just a stompbox pedal: it includes 12 reverb machines with studio quality, allowing you to generate whichever reverb sound that you could imagine.

Plug into BigSky and instantly lift your sound into the stratosphere

As I don’t have words to describe this pedal, I better paste what Strymon says about it.

Plug into BigSky and instantly lift your sound into the stratosphere. 

The world below you fades into the distance, and you’re elevated into a glow of lush, glorious, radiant reverbs. To create a reverb experience as natural, beautiful, and immersive as BigSky required tremendous feats of sound engineering and artistic imagination. 

Using the fundamentals of acoustical science as our beacon, we carefully studied and scientifically analyzed reverb technology from the past fifty years. We faithfully captured the essence of these classic sounds, and forged ahead to dream up our vision of reverbs from the future.

Features and controls

You will be really impressed with its sound. It includes 12 reverb modes.

Room and Hall recreate different sizes of reverberating environments, from a small studio up to the biggest cathedral;

Plate and Spring recreate real plate and spring tanks;

Swell brings in the reverb gradually behind the dry signal for subtle evolving textures, like having a volume pedal on the wet signal;

Bloom features a ‘bloom generating’ section that feeds into a traditional reverb ‘tank’, and adds a unique Feedback parameter that expands the possibilities exponentially;

Cloud obscures the distinction between reality and fantasy;

Chorale will make you sound like a vocal choir;

Shimmer uses two tunable voices add pitch-shifted tones to the reverberated signal, for resplendent, unearthly ambience;

Magneto machine sets up a multi-head echo with all heads on;

Nonlinear includes a variety of physics-defying reverb shapes, like three ‘backwards’ shapes (Swoosh, Reverse, and Ramp), or a Gate and more; and

Reflections, which is a psycho-acoustically accurate small-space reverb that allows you to move your amp anywhere in the room. The Reflections algorithm precisely calculates 250 reflections based on the source position within the chosen room shape. The psycho-acoustic modifiers adjust for human auditory perception to create unparalleled ambient-space realism to dry instrument or vocal tracks.

The Strymon BigSky is also hugely versatile concerning connectivity. It has right and left in/outs for true stereo, and expression pedal control. It also features MIDI in and out, and a Cab Filter speaker emulator, to connect the BigSky directly to the PA or recording console. It is powered via 9V negative power supply, drawing some 300mA.

It has 9 controls (type, value, decay, pre-delay, mix, tone, param 1, param 2 and mod) and 3 stomp switches (A, B, C). The switches allow you to activate/bypass each preset, navigate among different banks, and freeze or (infinite) sustain your reverb.

  • Type control allows you selecting up to 12 reverb machines: Room, Hall, Plate, Spring, Swell, Bloom, Cloud, Chorale, Shimmer, Magneto, Nonlinear, Reflections.
  • Value can be used to scroll through different presets, among other additional functionalities (i.e. set presets, assign parameters to the knobs, etc.)
  • The decay knob changes the length of the reverb.
  • The pre-delay sets the delay time until the reverb effect appears.
  • By rolling the mix knob you’ll change from a 100% dry sound up to a 100% wet one.
  • The tone control has an impact over the high frequency response of the reverb.
  • Both Param 1 and Param 2 can be assigned to different parameters depending on the reverb machine you are using. It is a very useful feature when playing live.
  • Mod adds a little modulation to the reverb. From just a little effect up to some more noticeable presence, modulation provides a nice warmness to your tone.

Sound

What can I say about how this pedal sounds?

There is nothing related to reverb that this guy can’t give you. You’ll get any type of “classic” reverb sound, plus many other sidereal interstellar-like tones. Not to say the great versatility that it offers with its parametrizable controls and switches.

Ok, the price is high, but if you want more than just another reverb pedal, the Strymon BigSky is the one you should pick. Needless to say that this pedal will give you its full potential at the studio, in full stereo.

Just check out all the videos of the below, and start saving some money… When you hear this pedal, you just start wanting one

Should you buy this pedal?

First, you must decide if the Strymon BigSky fits within your budget, because it’s not cheap. You can check the best price here.

You should buy this pedal if you are looking for the best reverb pedal of the market. You won’t use this pedal just for gigs or playing at home, but for the highest quality sound applications and studio recording. Any music you play will fit the possibilities that the BigSky can bring you. You can plug it to any instrument too, and even the voices will sound crystal clear with it.

You won’t think about buying this pedal if you are on a tight budget, or you are simply looking for a simple reverb pedal to add some texture to your sound. The possibilities are endless, and you have to be a little teckie, better if you do like playing with knobs…

Alternatives to the Strymon BigSky

There are only two devices out there (in stompbox format) that can be comparable to the Strymon BigSky.

One of them is the Eventide Space, very similar in features and versatility. It will allow you to store 100 presents too, so will be very handy when playing live too. The Eventide is in the same price range of the BigSky, so you will have a tough decision here.

Check out the video below to see the two of them face to face.

The other is the BigSky’s little brother, the Strymon blueSky. It doesn’t have that many reverb machines, nor can you control so many parameters. However, the two of them sound pretty similar with the reverb modes that the blueSky has. The price of the blueSky is also considerably lower, so check that option out if you love the BigSky but don’t want to spend that much.

Watch them both in this great comparison video by Shnobel.

If you want to have a lot of versatility regarding reverb modes and knobs to play with, you can check the Electro Harmonix Cathedral reverb too. Its price is way lower, and the sound quality is great too. Using the Cathedral in stereo could give you magnificent ambiences with it endless decay, so check that out too.

Conclusion

Check out the pros and cons that summarize the Strymon BigSky review:

PROS

  • Great versatility. Up to 12 reverb types very parametrizable with the knobs. You can set two knobs to control the parameters you want
  • The ambient reverbs (rooms and halls) are hugely realistic
  • True stereo and the best sound quality
  • You can store up to 300 presets
  • Orbital sounds that you won’t get with any other pedal

CONS

  • The only concern could be its high price, but it is a great value. You have to pay to own the best reverb pedal

My conclusion is that the Strymon BigSky is a great (the greatest) device, without any doubt the best reverb pedals that I’ve ever played. Apart from being realistic in the recreation of different reverberation ambiences and techniques, it features outerspace sidereal sounds, that will blow your mind in stereo.

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Mad Professor is a synonym of sound quality, and the Silver Spring Reverb is a great example of it. It has been designed to sound great with both clean and distorted sounds, something that is difficult in stompbox-size reverb pedals.

The dry signal stays fully analog and only the reverb is digitally filtered. It’ll be killer when placing it within your FX loop, but it won’t get nasty if placed before the overdrives and distortion pedals. It is super easy to use, and you won’t ged mad just trying to sound great.

Built the Mad Professor way: small footprint and big tone

This is what Mad Professor says about this pedal:

The SSR’s sound is exceptional with a clean signal, but was specifically designed to work equally well with the tougher performance requirements of distorted tone. The SSR can be used before distortion, although it was primarily designed to go after. If you use the SSR before distortion, you may want to use a lower Reverb (Wet/Dry) setting.

Built the Mad Professor way: small footprint and big tone.

Features and controls

As most of spring reverb pedals, the Silver Spring Reverb is mono, so you’ll only see single input and output connectors. On the other hand, this stompbox is powered with a 9V negative power supply, requiring at least 80mA of current.

The controls of the Silver Spring Reverb are pretty standard too. It has 3 knobs: Time, Tone and Reverb, and the true bypass stomp switch. This is how the knobs will affect your sound like:

  • Time sets the length of the reverb
  • Tone control adjusts the high frequency response of the reverb. It’ll get darker counter clockwise, and brighter when rolling it clockwise.
  • Reverb controls the amount of reverb mixed with the dry signal. You’ll get the dry signal when all the way down, but it won’t get up to a fully wet reverb if rolled all the way up.

Sound

I’ve already said that the Mad Professor Silver Spring Reverb sounds great. It’s capable of recreating studio-quality room reverbs with different sizes: from a small warm studio and a plated bathroom to a big church.

But here comes something that some people may argue about. Despite including the Spring word in its name, I don’t personally think that you’ll get a spring reverb sound with this pedal. At least, not the sound of the old school, vintage tube-driven spring tanks.

I didn’t have the chance to enjoy playing with it for a long time, but I wasn’t able to hear those characteristic sounds of springs anyway.

You won’t get disappointed if you’re looking for a simple reverb that just sound great, is simple to use, and can get along perfectly with your amp and distorted sounds.

Check out the video below to hear what kind of crystal clear room ambiences this guy can get you.

Should you buy this pedal?

Now this question is a little tricky in the case of the Silver Spring Reverb. If you are looking for a vintage spring reverb sound, you have better options than the Mad Professor. On the other hand, if you’re looking for natural reverbs, you have better options too (see the alternatives section).

But, if you are looking for a reverb pedal that does not color your sound and recreates small to medium natural ambiences, this pedal is great. It is the perfect solution to tune the knobs the way you like and just leave it there. You’ll see how it’ll just make you sound better.

Alternatives to the Mad Professor Silver Spring Reverb

The Wampler Faux Spring Reverb is a very similar pedal within the same price range. It’ll be a matter of personal taste if you prefer one over the other.

If what you really like is spring reverb, you have better options that recreate vintage sounds of outboard spring tanks. In my opinion, the best of those is Catalinbread Topanga Spring Reverb. It is pure old school. On the other hand, you also have the Mr. Black Deluxe Plus, this one is great for surf music, and looks so cool…

On the other end, you have one of the beasts of Strymon, the blueSky. This one will allow you recreating the best reverbs you can imagine. You may think it’s pricy, but will change your mind if you have the chance to play with it.

Conclusion

This is the summary of my review of the Mad Professor Silver Spring Reverb:

PROS

  • It sounds really warm
  • It is true bypass
  • The dry signal stays fully analog
  • The sound quality is great, the pedal is noiseless
  • Very easily tunable, the knobs will just make what you want them to do

CONS

  • It doesn’t really sound like a vintage outboard spring unit
  • It’s not capable of extreme reverbs

I love spring reverb pedals, because they are simple to use and because I love the feeling of vintage spring tanks of the early sixties. You won’t find that stuff in the Silver Spring Reverb though. It sounds great, but too HiFi, although this pristine sound is great for recreating natural reverberating ambients too…

Check out the price of this pedal here.

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Catalinbread Topanga Spring Reverb

I must say this: in my opinion, the Catalinbread Topanga Spring reverb is the best spring reverb pedal I’ve ever played.

It looks beautiful, and it has a je ne sais quoi that makes it sound think, warm, and very realistic. It sounds like a tube-driven spring tank from the sixties.

Read here what other people say about this pedal.

Big wet and splashy. 60’s outboard spring reverb tank

This is what the guys from Catalinbread say about the Topanga Spring Reverb:

The outboard Fender 6G15 spring reverb unit is the sound of Surf guitar, Spaghetti Western and many other great guitar sounds from the sixties. 

Part of its magic, and how it differs from the internal spring reverb found in most Fender-style amps, is that it is run *in front* of the amp, causing the reverb signal to distort and sound more intense. Because there were additional knobs on the outboard units, you also have more control over the reverb qualities. 

The Dwell knob controlled how hard the springs were getting hit by the guitar signal. The Tone knob allowed the treble to be dialed back to just the right degree of brightness. 

It was also essentially a tube preamp, so it would color the sound going into the amp. All this added up to a very distinctive reverb sound with a lot of attitude and complex non-linearities that are hard to replicate. 

But we here at Catalinbread did just that! Besides giving you the classic three knob control compliment of the original, we’ve also added a great discrete preamp that you can control via the Volume knob for a healthy amount of great clean boost when you want it.

This pedal is conceived just as vintage reverb tanks were, to be connected at the input of your amp. You won’t want to use this pedal in the effects loop. This guy will provide you with holy vintage sounds by driving your preamp. By using its volume knob, you can boost the sound so the reverb is a little saturated by your amp, creating a more intense sound.

Features and controls

Catalinbread Topanga spring reverb is very simple regarding its connectivity: it’s got mono in and out, and is powered by 9V negative power supply. It requires some 80mA of current.

The controls of this pedal are the typical ones you will find in most spring reverb pedals, but with an additional Volume control, which takes more juice out of the Topanga. It has 4 knobs: Dwell, Tone, Mix and Volume, and a single stomp switch.

  • The Dwell knob controls how much signal is going into and driving reverb springs. As on vintage tube-drivenl units, cranking this knob up can cause clipping on the wet side due to the signal crashing the springs. It sounds real!
  • The Tone control will let you sound brighter (clockwise) or darker (counter clockwise).
  • Mix adjusts the amount of reverb that blends with the dry sound. Rolling it all the way up, you can get a fully wet sound.
  • Volume is the essence of this pedal. This knob acts as a volume control of any preamp, allowing you to boost the sound. You will hear the difference this control brings by connecting your overdriven tube amp (or an overdrive pedal) just after the Topanga. The spring reverb will scream…

Sound

I’ve said at the beginning. This pedal is different from any other spring reverb pedal. This pedal sounds like real outboard spring reverb tanks.

batman-robin-reverbWell, some hardcore surfers may argue with that…

From the moment you stomp on it, you can find the difference. It sounds great from the moment you switch it on, because the knobs do what they as supposed to do. It’s true that it’ll give you its best by connecting it just before your gain pedals (or preamp of your tube amp).

Unless you’re using fuzz, its reverb sound will get sweetly and warmly distorted, but the reverb doesn’t get like dirty or noisy. It’s just great!!

I’ve read that there is a trick that allows you having a very different sounding reverb. It has something to see with modulation… It seems there’s a youtube video where you can see what it is like and how to do it. Drop a comment below if you try it!

I cannot explain why is that different, but check out the video playlist below and see how you can play with the Volume control to make it scream!

Should I buy this pedal?

If you are into surf music and are serious about that, you’ll probably have a tube-driven spring tank. If you want a backup solution for convenience, or just practice at home, you MUST buy this pedal.

If you just love the sound of real outboard spring tanks rather than the spring reverbs that are built-in tube amplifiers, you’ll want the best spring reverb pedal. Buy the Topanga, it’s the best.

If you’re happy with the reverb you have in your amp and don’t see the possibilities that driving your preamp with a reverb up front gives you, you won’t probably think of buying a reverb pedal. Therefore, you won’t be thinking about buying (another) spring reverb device.

You should’t buy this pedal if you want to be able to recreate different reverb sounds, like rooms, halls, etc. This will give you the sound of a spring tank.

Alternatives to the Catalinbread Topanga Spring Reverb

To be honest, the best alternative to the Topanga is an outboard spring tank, like the ’63 Fender Tube Reverb reissue.

If we are talking about stompboxes, you should probably look to the Fender FRV-1 ’63 Fender Reverb. This pedal recreates the sound of the ’63 Fender Tube Reverb in stompbox format. It is a bit cheaper, and doesn’t sound as pure (although sounds pretty realistic) as the Topanga. But this pedal is cool (has the Fender logo on it…)

Other spring reverb pedals alternatives are the Wampler Faux Spring Reverb and the Mad Professor Silver Spring Reverb. These units sound great too, but not as dark, old school, and pure as the Topanga. They sound a little more modern to be.

Conclusion

These are the pros and cons that I found when tested the Catalinbread Topanga Spring Reverb.

PROS

  • It does a great job by recreating the sound of vintage tube-driven spring tanks. It gets really close…
  • The volume knob allows you adjusting how hard you will drive your gain stages, just like old tube units did in the sixties
  • Quality of the pedal. It’s hand built using the best components
  • Wide range of the knobs
  • Bright reverbs don’t sound harsh. By rolling the Tone knob all the way up, the sound’s still warm
  • It sounds excellent when fully wet. You won’t feel any digital reminiscence in the tail of the reverb
  • The dry signal is fully analog

CONS

  • The purist surf guitarists will say that (like every other spring reverb pedal) it just can’t replace an outboard spring tank
  • It can be easily clipped (you have to be careful with the Dwell knob and you may use a 18V power supply)

The conclusion is clear to me. After playing the pedal for a while, and after watching the youtube videos of the playlist above and reading a few reviews by real users and expert opinions in forums, I would say that the Catalinbread Topanga Spring Reverb is the best spring reverb pedal.

If you are a purist, you’ll say that there is no way that a solid-state spring reverb pedal could ever replace a tube-driven spring tank. I agree with that, the same way as you may argue that a solid-state amp could never get close to the vintage sound of a tube amplifier. BUT, the Catalinbread Topanga Spring Reverb really nails it. It gets close indeed.

You can check the price of the Topanga here.

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I do love Strymon. And I love the blueSky reverb, which you may consider to be like the little brother of the Strymon bigSky, which is, by no means, the best reverb pedal I’ve ever played.

Producing the most lush, majestic and stunning reverbs ever

The philosophy behind our blueSky Reverberator is simple—take a ridiculously powerful SHARC DSP and dedicate it to doing one thing only: producing the most lush, majestic and stunning reverbs ever. Many hours and sleepless nights in the Strymon sound design labs were devoted to developing the complex reverb algorithms found inside blueSky. We squeezed every last drop of processing power available.

Whether you’re a classic spring reverb fan or a studio rack aficionado, you’ll find your mojo here. blueSky provides three different reverb types, each with three modes, for a total of nine completely unique reverb experiences. blueSky even delivers an extremely versatile plate reverb, a rarity for a stompbox pedal. A full pre-delay and damping section provide deep reverb tone shaping. Add the mod and shimmer modes and you’re in store for unending reverb bliss. Couple that with 24-bit 96kHz converters and 115dB typical signal to noise, blueSky is equally at home on top of a studio console as it is in front of a tube amp.

I’m sure that is true.

Features and controls

The features of the blueSky are reduced with regard to those of the SkyVerb. You won’t have that many reverb machines, nor that many controls and parameters, and you won’t be able to store presets. It is more like any other regular reverb pedal. But it is not just like any other reverb pedal…

You can check the differences between the two Strymon units in this great video by Shnobel.

The Strymon blueSky is also true stereo. You’ll find the four jack connectors in the back of the pedal, aligned with the power supply socket. The blueSky is powered with a standard 9V negative power supply, and you will need to feed it with at least 250mA. It is an awesome pedal, so you’ll need an awesome power supply too.

The pedal have 2 small switches, one of them controlling the type of the reverb (plate, room, spring), and the other to add an additional effect to the reverb: norm (no effect added), mod for some modulation, and shimmer. It also has 5 knobs: Decay, Mix, Low Damp, Pre-Delay and High Damp, and two stomp switches: one for activating the pedal and the other to select a preset, where you can store your favorite sound.

This pedal is true bypass and the dry signal stays fully analog.

This is how the controls work like in the blueSky:

  • Decay controls the length of the reverb. Set low for small rooms, plates and short springs. Roll it up for cavernous sounds, big plates and longer springs.
  • Mix adjusts the balance between the dry (fully analog) signal and the wet reverberated one. You’ll get a 100% dry at lowest, and 100% wet when turned all the way up. The 50/50 mix occurs at about 3 o’clock.
  • Low Damp controls the amount of low damping in the wet signal. When turned counter clockwise you’ll reduce the amount of low end in the reverb decay trail.
  • Pre-Delay sets the delay time between the dry signal and the apparition of the reverberated one. This control is great for recreating different environments.
  • High Damp controls the amount of high damping in the wet signal. When turned counter clockwise you’ll reduce the amount of high end in the reverb decay trail.

Sound

You’ll have amazing experiences when playing through any Strymon pedal. I took it easy trying this pedal in a guitar store in Paris during a work trip, and I got shocked. You won’t have such a great dynamics with another pedal, it responded great to both Strat and Les Paul.

It is a little pricy too, but you have to pay for the best stuff.

Apart from my poor english vocabulary (I’m sorry for that), there is nothing I could say that makes justice for how this pedal sounds like. As it’s said, a single image is worth a thousand words, so check out the videos in the playlist below to listen to the Strymon blueSky.

Simply one of the best reverb pedals you can get.

Strymon blueSky playlist

Should you buy this pedal?

As always, it depends.

If you’re looking for a spring reverb pedal, you have better options out there. The blueSky has also a Spring reverb mode, but the Catalinbread Topanga Spring Reverb, the Wampler Faux Spring Reverb or the Mr. Black Deluxe Plus are better alternatives for that.

If you want to add an ambient reverb to your tone and don’t want to get lost among tons of knobs, presets and parameters, the blueSky is the best choice for that.

Alternatives to the Strymon blueSky

That is hard to say.

You may find similar functionalities in both the Electro Harmonix Cathedral and the TC Electronic Hall of Fame. Both are stereo too, and will let you play with different reverb modes. However, you won’t find in them the pristinness you’ll experiment with the Strymon. But, they are cheaper, so definitely something to consider if the price is an issue.

It the price is not an issue, the alternatives are simply the big guys: the Strymon bigSky and the Eventide Spice Reverb. Those are, without any doubt, the best reverb pedals.

Conclusion

This is a short summary of the review:

PROS

  • It is Strymon
  • The sound is just amazing
  • It is true stereo
  • Dry analog path and high res ADC and DAC
  • Great responding five knobs
  • Made in USA

CONS

  • Price
  • You may not feel its full potential live

The Strymon blueSky is, by no means, one of the greatest reverb pedals for natural ambience sounds. It will show you its full potential in stereo, and it’s killer for recording, but it is great to play with at home too. If you can afford it and don’t (or can’t) go for the big fishes (Strymon bigSky or Eventide Space), get one!

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Mooer Shimverb

I absolutely love the Micro series of Mooer pedals. They are small, you have a wide selection of pedals to chose from, they look nice and they sound awesome. And, if you are looking for budget gear, you should check them out.

You have two choices if looking for a micro reverb pedal by Mooer: the Skyverb and the Shimverb. I’ve included the Shimverb in my Best Reverb Pedal Top-15 list because of its shimmery effects, which I absolutely love. It also has Room and Spring reverb modes, so plenty of flexibility here.

You can read here what other people is saying about this pedal.

Features and controls

This pedal is powered via 9V negative power supply. Even though Mooer says that the pedal requires 128mA of current to operate, I’ve read some reviews saying that the Shimverb only draws 10mA, which will allow you to daisy chain a lot of these pedals with a standard power supply.

In any case, I’m not very fan of daisy chaining and I haven’t verified the power consumption, so you better take this feature with some care. It includes the mono input and output connectors in the common asymmetrical layout to optimize staging a few more Mooer pedals with their special PC-Z connectors.

This pedal has three knobs (Level, Color and Decay), a small switch for changing the type of the reverb (Room, Spring, Shimmer), and a single stomp switch (true bypass) to activate the pedal. This is how the knobs of the pedal work:

  • Level controls the amount of reverb that will add to the dry sound.
  • Color changes the tone of the reverb by taking over high frequencies
  • Decay will adjust the length of the reverb.

Sound

Now it’s time to talk about how it sounds. Well, the Mooer Shimverb is the cheapest pedal of this list, and you can be sure that it won’t sound like the others. However, I think it sounds pretty good too.

In my opinion, the Room mode sounds warm and feels analog. You can set small studio-like reverbs or bigger hall ambiences. On the other hand, I love the heavenly sweet sounds that the Shimmer gives you by adding a 5th.

However, the Spring reverb doesn’t sound as realistic as it does in other spring reverb pedals. It feels a little digital. Once thing that I noticed is that the output volume is kind of reduced when using this pedal, so better use a boost in front of it.

In any case, you better check out the videos in the playlist below and see what this little boy is capable of.

Should you buy this pedal?

You may be interested in buying this pedal if your budget for a reverb pedal is very tight. Don’t spend 40 bucks in other cheap reverb pedals that you may find, just spend a little more and get a Shimverb.

On the other hand, you may like this pedal for its Shimmer feature. Some people hate it, but other love it. If that is your case, you’ll buy it, the price is great.

Think about it if you don’t have much room on your pedalboard. The Shimverb is really tiny and very easily daisy-chained, as its power consumption is low (I’ve read some other reviews that say its just about 10mA).

Don’t think about the Shimverb if you are serious about reverb. If you are looking a reverb pedal that sounds analog or love vintage spring tanks, you have better options out there.

Alternatives to the Mooer Shimverb

You may find other cheaper reverb pedals in the market, but they are more toys than real pedals. The Shimverb in the cheapest pedal on the best reverb pedal list, and its alternatives are all more expensive. And yes, they sound better too…

A kind of alternative could be the Electro Harmonix Holy Grail Nano. It also has Spring and Room effects (Hall in the case of the Holy Grail), and they sound much better than the in the Shimverb. It doesn’t have Shimmer, but has a mixture between reverb and flanger called Flerb, that is kind of unique among reverb pedals.

Conclusion

The Mooer Shimverb is a tiny little pedal that sounds pretty good and has a great price. This is the summary of my review.

PROS

  • True bypass
  • It’s tiny and looks great
  • Very low power consumption, so you can daisy-chain a lot of pedals from the Micro Series by Mooer
  • A different sounding (but so cool) Shimmery effect
  • Great price
  • The Room reverb sounds warm and analog

CONS

  • Spring reverb sounds a little fake and too digital
  • Not very natural sounding at higher frequencies (Color control all the way up)

The Mooer Shimverb is a tiny little reverb pedal that will do the job, unless you are serious about reverb. Its price is great and it will fit on any pedalboard, so it can be a good thing to include in your gigbag, just in case.